Nobel Laureates, Plenary & Invited Speakers

ICPS 2020 Nobel Laureates

Prof. Donna Strickland, University of Waterloo

Prof. Donna Strickland is one of the recipients of the Nobel Prize in Physics 2018 for co-inventing Chirped Pulse Amplification with Dr. Gérard Mourou, her PhD supervisor at the time of the discovery. She earned her PhD in optics from the University of Rochester and her B. Eng. from McMaster University. Prof. Strickland was a research associate at the National Research Council Canada, a physicist at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and a member of technical staff at Princeton University.

In 1997, she joined the University of Waterloo, where her ultrafast laser group develops high-intensity laser systems for nonlinear optics investigations. She is a recipient of a Sloan Research Fellowship, a Premier’s Research Excellence Award and a Cottrell Scholar Award. She served as the president of the Optical Society (OSA) in 2013 and is an OSA Fellow and an SPIE Fellow.

Prof. Dr. Klaus von Klitzing, Max Planck Institute

Prof. Dr. Klaus von Klitzing was born on 28th June 1943 in Schroda. Klaus von Klitzing studied Physics at the Technical University of Braunschweig. He continued his scientific career at the University of Würzburg, receiving his doctorate in 1972 and his habilitation in 1978. Subsequently, he was appointed professor at the Technical University of Munich (1980-1984), before becoming both Honorarprofessor (part-time prof.) at the University of Stuttgart and Director and Scientific Member at the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research in 1985. During his scientific career, Klaus von Klitzing had research stays at the University of Oxford, England, at the High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Grenoble, France, and at the IBM Research Lab in the Yorktown Heights, USA.
In 1985, the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to Klaus von Klitzing “for the discovery of the quantized Hall effect”. Click here to view Prof. Klaus von Klitzing’S curriculum vitae.

ICPS 2020 Plenary Speakers

Prof. Aleksandra Radenovic, EPFL

Aleksandra Radenovic received her master’s degree in physics from the University of Zagreb in 1999 before joining Professor Giovanni Dietler’s Laboratory of Physics of Living Matter in 2000 at University of Lausanne. There she earned her Doctor of Sciences degree in 2003. In 2003 she was also awarded a research scholarship for young researchers from the Swiss Foundation for Scientific Research which allowed her to spend 3 years as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, Berkeley (2004-2007). Before joining EPFL as Assistant Professor in 2008 she spent 6 months at NIH and Janelia Farm. In 2010 she received the ERC starting grant and in 2015 SNSF Consolidator grant. Her group is interested in using novel nanomaterials and single molecule experimental techniques to study fundamental questions at nanoscale.

Prof. Allan H. MacDonald, The University of Texas at Austin

Allan H. MacDonald received his B.Sc. degree from St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada in 1973, and M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in physics from the University of Toronto in 1974 and 1978. He was a member of the research staff of the National Research Council of Canada from 1978 to 1987 and has taught at Indiana University (1987-2000) and the University of Texas  at Austin (2000-present) where he now holds the Sid W. Richardson Chair in Physics. He has contributed to research on electronic structure theory, the quantum Hall effect, magnetism, and superconductivity, among a variety of other topics. Dr. MacDonald is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the US National Academy of Sciences and has been awarded the Herzberg Medal (1987), the Buckley Prize (2007), and the Ernst Mach Honorary Medal (2012).

Prof. Dr. Claudia Felser, Max Planck Institute

Claudia Felser studied chemistry and physics at the University of Cologne (Germany, completing there both her diploma in solid state chemistry (1989) and her doctorate in physical chemistry (1994). After postdoctoral fellowships at the Max Planck Institute in Stuttgart (Germany) and the CNRS in Nantes (France), she joined the University of Mainz (Germany) in 1996 becoming a full professor there in 2003. She is currently Director at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids in Dresden (Germany). Her research foci are the design and discovery of novel inorganic compounds, in particular, Heusler compounds for multiple applications and new topological quantum materials. Felser was honored as a Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE Magnetics Society. In 2011 and 2017 she received an ERC Advanced grant. Felser was awarded the Alexander M. Cruickshank Lecturer Award of the Gordon Research Conference, a SUR-grant Award from IBM and the Tsungmin Tu Research Prize from the Ministry of Science and Technology of Taiwan, the highest academic honor granted to foreign researchers in Taiwan. She is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and the Institute of Physics, London and since 2018 a member of the Leopoldina, the German National Academy of Sciences, the Acatech (German National Academy of Engineering) and since 2020 International Member of National Academy of engineering, USA.  In 2019 she received the APS James C. McGroddy Prize for New Materials together with Bernevig and Dai.

Prof. Giulia Galli, University of Chicago

Prof. Giulia Galli is the Liew Family professor of Electronic Structure and Simulations in the Institute for Molecular Engineering and Professor of Chemistry at the University of Chicago. She also holds a Senior Scientist position at Argonne National Laboratory, where she is the director the Midwest Integrated Center for Computational Materials.  Prior to joining UChicago, she was Professor of Chemistry and Physics at UC Davis (2005-2013) and the head of the Quantum Simulations group at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL, 1998-2005). She holds a Ph.D. in Physics from the International School of Advanced Studies in Italy. She is a Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS) and American Association for the Advancement of Science. She is the recipient of the LLNL Science and Technology Award, the Department of Energy Award of Excellence, the 2018 Materials Research Society Theory Award, and the 2019 APS David Adler Lectureship in Materials Physics.

Prof. Jelena Vuckovic, Stanford University

Jelena Vuckovic (PhD Caltech 2002) is a Professor of Electrical Engineering and by courtesy of Applied Physics at Stanford, where she leads the Nanoscale and Quantum Photonics Lab, and is a director of Q-FARM, Stanford-SLAC Quantum Science and Engineering Initiative. Vuckovic has received many awards including the Distinguished Fellow of the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics – MPQ (2019), the Hans Fischer Senior Fellowship from the Institute for Advanced Studies in Munich (2013), the Humboldt Prize (2010), the DARPA Young Faculty Award (2008), the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE in 2007), and the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award (2006). She is a Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS), of the Optical Society of America (OSA), and of the Institute of Electronics and Electrical Engineers (IEEE).

Prof. Laurens W. Molenkamp - University of Groningen

Laurens W. Molenkamp is an experimental condensed matter physicist specializing in quantum
transport studies. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Groningen, subsequently spent
several years with Philips Research Laboratories in Eindhoven and as Associate Professor at the
RWTH in Aachen. He came to the University of Würzburg in 1999, where he is the Chair of
Experimental Physics III and leads the Institute for Topological Insulators. His research interests
include transport in nanostructured magnetic and topological materials, grown in‐house by MBE
techniques. Since 2012, he has been the Editor of the condensed matter physics journal Physical
Review B. He has received numerous awards for his observation of the quantum spin Hall effect,
opening up the field of topological materials. Amongst these are the Europhysics Prize, the Oliver E.
Buckley Condensed Matter Prize and a DFG Leibniz Award. He is a member of the Dutch and
Bavarian Academies of Science.

Prof. Masataka Higashiwaki, NICT

Masataka Higashiwaki received the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in solid-state physics from Osaka University, Japan, in 1994, 1996, and 1998, respectively. After a two-year postdoctoral fellow, in 2000, he joined the Communications Research Laboratory (CRL), Japan. From 2007 to 2010, he took a temporary leave from the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), which was renamed from CRL, and joined the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara as a Project Scientist. He returned to NICT in 2010 and started a pioneering work on Ga2O3-based electronics. He is now a Director at Green ICT Device Advanced Development Center. Higashiwaki is a recipient of several awards, including the 2014 Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Prize and the 2007 International Symposium on Compound Semiconductors (ISCS) Young Scientist Award. His current research interest is in Ga2O3 device and material engineering.

Prof. Pascale Senellart, Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology France

More information will be available soon.

Prof. Sankar Das Sarma, University of Maryland

Sankar Das Sarma, a theoretical condensed matter physicist, is the Richard E Prange Chair of Physics and a Distinguished University Professor at the University of Maryland, College Park.  He is also the Director of the Condensed Matter Theory Center and a Fellow of the Joint Quantum Institute at the University of Maryland.  Das Sarma’s field of research covers semiconductor physics, low dimensional electron systems, many body theory, strongly correlated materials, quantum topological phenomena, quantum Hall effects, Dirac and Weyl materials, many body localization, superconductivity, magnetism, Majorana fermions, spintronics, statistical mechanics, and quantum information.  Das Sarma’s work on solid state quantum computers focuses on semiconductor quantum dot based spin qubits and semiconductor nanowire based topological qubits.

Prof. Seigo Tarucha, Center for Emergent Matter Science (CESM) Japan

Seigo Tarucha received the B. E. and M. S. degrees in the University of Tokyo in 1976 and 1978, respectively and joined NTT Basic Research Laboratories. He received the Ph. D degree in the University of Tokyo in 1986. In 1998 he moved to the University of Tokyo as a professor in Phys. Department and then to Appl. Phys. Department in 2005. He was a guest scientist in Max-Planck-Institute in 1986 and 1987 and in Delft University in 1995. He is currently working on quantum transport in semiconductor nanostructures and spin-based quantum computing. He was a director of Cryogenic Center in the Tokyo university from 2015 to 2017, and has been a division head of Quantum Information Electronics in Center for Emergent Matter Science (CESM), Riken since 2013. He has been a deputy of CEMS since 2018. He received Kubo Ryogo award, The Quantum Devices award in 1998, Nishina award in 2002, National medal with purple ribbon in 2004, Leo Esaki Award in 2007, and Achievement award of Japan Applied Physics Society in 2018.

Prof. Young Hee Lee, Sungkyunkwan University Korea

Prof. Young Hee Lee has been a full professor of the Physics Department at SKKU, since 2001. He received Ph. D. from Kent State University in Ohio (1986) in physics. Prior to joining SKKU in 2001, Prof. Lee was a full professor in the Physics Department at Chonbuk National University since 1986. He was a visiting scholar at Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University in 1989, IBM, Zurich in 1993, and Michigan State University in 1996. Currently, he is the Director of Center for Integrated Nanostructure Physics, Institute for Basic Science (IBS) at SKKU. He was awarded the first SKKU fellow in 2004 at SKKU, Science award from Korean Physical Society in 2005, Lee Hsun Research Award, IMR, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China in 2007, Presidential Award in Science and Education, Korea in 2008, and Einstein Award IMR, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China in 2017. He was also nominated as a National Scholar by Ministry of Education in 2006 and has been a fellow of Korean Academy of Science and Technology (KAST) since 2007, and fellow of TWAS in 2019. He got Sudang prize and 2015 and recently Kyung Am prize in 2019.

Prof. Yuanbo Zhang, Fudan University China

Yuanbo Zhang received his BS from Peking University in 2000 and his PhD in Physics from Columbia University in 2006. He was a Miller Research Fellow at the University of California at Berkeley from Sept. 2006 to Jun. 2009, a postdoc research associate at IBM Almaden Research Center from Mar. 2010 to Sept. 2010, and a professor of Fudan University from 2011. His main research interests are: Electronic transport in low-dimensional systems including graphene; Scanning probe techniques and their application in studying low-dimensional nanostructures. Major honors include: IUPAP Young Scientist Prize, International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (2010); Nishina Asia Award, Nishina Memorial Foundation, Japan (2014).

ICPS 2020 Invited Speakers

A. 2D materials beyond graphene

Jun Zhu – Penn State University

Professor Jun Zhu received her PhD from Columbia University in 2003. She was a postdoc fellow in Cornell University from 2003-2005 before joining Penn State University in 2006. She is currently a Professor of Physics at Penn State. Her research interest focuses on the understanding of new physics and device functionalities arising from reduced dimensionality, many-body interactions and the control of new electronic degrees of freedom in nanoscale materials and devices. Her recent research projects explore the electronic properties of van der Waals materials and interferences, with a particular emphasis on valleytronic, topological, and quantum Hall phenomena.

Xiaoqin (Elaine) Li

Information available soon 

B. Boron nitride: defect properties, photonics, polaritons and growth

Alex Zettl – UC Berkeley

Alex Zettl is a Professor of Physics at UC Berkeley. He is the former director of NSEC: The Center of Integrated Nanomechanical Systems at Berkeley, and current lead PI of the sp2 Nanoscience Program at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He has been the recipient of the R&D Top 100 three times, most recently for his lab’s invention of EPIC process to synthesize Boron Nitride Nanotubes in bulk, as well as the 2013 Feyman prize winner in Nanotechnology. His research group holds the Guinness World Record for creating the world’s smallest radio from a single carbon nanotube.

Prof. James Edgar – Kansas State University

James H. Edgar is University Distinguished Professor in the Tim Taylor Department of Chemical Engineering at Kansas State University. He is currently on assignment at United States National Science Foundation as a manager of the Electronic and Photonic Materials Program in the Division of Materials Research. Dr. Edgar earned his BS and PhD degrees from the University of Kansas (1981) and University of Florida (1987) respectively. The focus of his research is on the application of chemical engineering principles to improve materials processing of electronic, optoelectronic, and photonic devices. His current research is on the crystal growth, characterization, and applications of hexagonal boron nitride.

Giorgia Fugallo- CNRS

Giorgia Fugallo is a permanent CNRS researcher at the Thermal and Energy Laboratory of Polytech’ Nantes.
She received her PhD in Physics at King’s College London in 2012, she was then a Postdoctoral Researcher at Sorbonne University-Paris VI and at the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne. Prior to join CNRS in 2017, she got back to France in 2014 with the EDF & Ecole Polytechnique “Renewable Energies” Research Fellow Grant. Her main research interests had indeed always focused on theoretical and numerical modelling of material properties for energy applications, ranging from conductive and radiative thermal properties for thermal management applications, to electronic excitations and excitonic effects in varied spectroscopies for photovoltaic applications. She has always been paying particular attention to intriguing dimensionality effects in layered materials.

Dr Soo Min Kim – Sookmyung Women’s University, Chemist Department

Information available soon 

 

C. Carbon: nanotubes and graphene

Prof. Dmitri Golberg – Australian Laureate Fellow 

Australian Laureate Fellow – Professor Dmitri Golberg – is a co-director of the Centre for Materials Science of Queensland University of Technology (QUT). He joined QUT in 2017 after more than 20 years of his career development in Japan, where he held the positions of Principal Investigator and Group Leader of the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), and an adjunct Professor of Tsukuba University. Dmitri is a recipient of Tsukuba Prize (2005), Thomson Reuters Research Front Award (2012), “Seto” Prize by Japan Microscopy Society (2016), NIMS President Award (2017) and QUT Faculty Award (2019). He published over 700 papers (>45,000 citations, H-118)), was nominated as a Highly Cited Researcher by Thomson Reuters over 2015-2019, registered over 130 Japanese and International patents, and delivered more than 150 Invited, Keynote and Plenary lectures at the International Forums. Currently, Dmitri is placed within top 300 most-cited world materials scientists on the Web of Science.

Dr. François Peeters – University of Antwerp

Dr. François Peeters is Professor of Physics at the University of Antwerp. He received the PhD degree in physics from the University of Antwerp in 1982. He did postdoctoral research at Bell Laboratory (Murray Hill, NJ, USA) and Bell Communications Research (Red Bank, NJ, USA). Peeters is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and the European Physical Society. He is a member of the Royal Flemish Academy of Belgium and of the Academia Europaea. The University of Szeged awarded him a Doctor Honoris Causa and in 2013 he was awarded the Francqui Chair. He is associate editor of Journal of Applied Physics, co-editor of Europhysics Letters and Editor-in-chief of Solid State Communications. He published over 1000 papers with more than 37,000 citations and h-index 84. His areas of interests are computational modelling of mesoscopic and nanoscopic semiconductor and superconducting nanostructures, like phase transitions (structural and melting), artificial atoms (quantum dots and coupled quantum dots), graphene and other two dimensional atomic layered systems.

Thomas Ihn – ETH Zurich

Information available soon 

D. Charge, valley and spin qubits

Mark A. Eriksson – Department of Physics at the University of Wisconsin-Madiso

Mark A. Eriksson is a Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor in the Department of Physics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  Prior to joining the University of Wisconsin in 1999 he received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1997 and was a postdoctoral member of technical staff at Bell Labs for two years from 1997-1999. Eriksson leads a multi-university team studying semiconductor-based quantum computing and focusing on the development of spin qubits in silicon/silicon-germanium gate-defined quantum dots. Eriksson is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Stephanie Simmons – Simon Fraser University

Stephanie Simmons is an Assistant Professor, Canada Research Chair, and CIFAR Fellow, in the Department of Physics at Simon Fraser University, and she leads the Silicon Quantum Technology research group. Stephanie Simmons earned a Ph.D. in Materials Science at Oxford University in 2011 as a Clarendon Scholar and a B.Math (Pure Mathematics and Mathematical Physics) from the University of Waterloo. She was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow of the Electrical Engineering Department at the University of New South Wales and held a Junior Research Fellowship and a Glasstone Fellowship at St. John’s College in Oxford University. Stephanie works on silicon-based spin qubits with the particular aim to develop CMOS-compatible scalable quantum technologies. Her work was awarded a Physics World Top Ten Breakthrough of the Year of 2013 and again in 2015. Her work has been covered by the New York Times, CBC, BBC, Scientific American, the New Scientist, and others.

John Nichol – University of Rochester

John Nichol is an assistant professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Rochester. Previously, he was a postdoctoral associate at Harvard University, and he earned a PhD from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Nichol investigates the quantum mechanics of nanoscale objects, especially individual electrons in semiconductor quantum dots. Nichol’s current research focuses on improving the coherence of electron spin qubits using new materials and control methods, exploring new ways to transfer quantum information between distant spin qubits, and many-body quantum coherence in spin chains. Nichol is a recipient of the NSF CAREER award.

Sophia Economou – Virginia Tech

Sophia Economou is an Associate Professor of Physics and the Hassinger Senior Fellow of Physics at Virginia Tech. She received her Ph.D. in Physics from the University of California, San Diego in 2006, after which she was a National Research Fellow at the Naval Research Lab, where she eventually held a Research Physicist staff position until 2015. In 2015, she moved to Virginia Tech as Associate Professor. Her present research interests are at the interface of quantum information science, condensed matter physics and quantum optics. She works on quantum computing, communication and simulation, spin qubits, nanophotonics, superconducting qubits, quantum control and decoherence.

Ferdinand Kuemmeth

Information available soon 

E. Complex oxide and chalcogenide semiconductors

Wan-Jian Yin – Soochow Institute for Energy and Materials InnovationS (SIEMIS) in Soochow University, China

Wan-Jian Yin is a professor in Soochow Institute for Energy and Materials InnovationS (SIEMIS) in Soochow University, China. He received his B.S. (2004) and Ph.D. (2009) from Fudan University, China. He was working in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and University of Toledo, USA from 2009 to 2015. He has started his current position in SIEMIS since 2015 under National Young Talent 1000 Program. His research interests include computational study of solar energy materials, defect physics in semiconductors and machine-learning on materials design. He has published more than 80 papers with over 6,000 citations

Xiaojing (Jeana) Hao – UNSW Research

Dr Xiaojing Hao obtained her PhD in the School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering of UNSW in 2010, and currently the Associate Professor, Scientia Fellow, and ARC Future Fellow at UNSW. Dr Hao has focused her research on low-cost high-efficiency thin film and tandem solar cells for more than ten years, researching on various compound semiconductor thin film PV materials, initially using Si, and then kesterite, more recently extended to other solar photovoltaic and solar fuel devices based on earth-abundant energy materials. Dr Hao now leads a strong group in the above areas. She has published more than 120 peer-reviewed journal papers, including publications in Nature Energy, Energy & Environmental Science, Advanced Energy Materials, with several awards for her research excellence. She was awarded the 2018 NSW’s Premier’s Prize for Energy Innovation in NSW and Australia’s Most Innovative Engineers 2019.

Anderson Janotti 

Information available soon 

F. Electron devices and applications

Dr. Nadine Collaert – IMEC

Dr. Nadine Collaert is program director at imec. She is currently responsible for the analog/RF program looking at heterogeneous integration of III-V/III-N devices with advanced CMOS to tackle the challenges of next generation mobile communication. Before that she was program director of the LOGIC Beyond Si program focused on the research on novel CMOS devices and new material-enabled device and system approaches to increase functionality. She has been involved in the theory, design, and technology of FinFET devices, emerging memories, transducers for biomedical applications and the integration and characterization of biocompatible materials. She has a PhD in electrical engineering from the KU Leuven and she holds more than 400 publications and more than 10 patents in the field of device design and process technology.

Dr. Qihua Xiong – Nanyang Technological University

Dr. Xiong is a leading expert in semiconductor optics. His research interest is particularly driven by the light-matter interactions in quantum materials in reduced dimensionality by optical spectroscopy. He has published more than 220 papers, which attracted more than 12000 citations with an H-index of 65. He was elected Fellow of American Physical Society in September 2018 and Academician of Asian Pacific Academy of Materials in 2019. His outstanding achievement has been recognized by a few prestigious awards, such as IPS Nanotechnology Physics Award (2015), Nanyang Award for Research Excellence by NTU (2014) and Singapore National Research Foundation Inaugural Investigatorship (NRFI) Award (2014). He currently serves as Associate Editor for Nano Letters. He serves as international advisory board for many prestigious international journals, such as ACS Photonics, Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics (IoP), Science China Materials, and Nano Research, Springer.

Dr. SungWoo Nam – University of Illinois 

Dr. SungWoo Nam is an Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering (MechSE) at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC). He received his M.A. in Physics (2007) and Ph.D. in Applied Physics (2011) from Harvard University. After his Ph.D., he worked as a postdoctoral research associate at University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Nam is the recipient of The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society (TMS) Early Career Faculty Fellow Award, NSF CAREER Award, two DoD (AFOSR and ONR) Young Investigator Program (YIP) Awards, NASA Early Career Faculty (ECF) Award, American Chemical Society (ACS) Petroleum Research Fund Doctoral New Investigator Award, UIUC Center for Advanced Study Fellow, UIUC Campus Distinguished Promotion Award, and UIUC Engineering Dean’s Award for Excellence in Research.

G. Low dimensional systems (Quantum Hall, transport theory, 1D, 2D)

Armando Rastelli – Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria

Prof. Armando Rastelli heads the Semiconductor Physics at the Johannes Kepler University of Linz, Austria since 2012. He obtained his PhD in Physics from the University of Pavia, Italy, in 2003. During his PhD he was research assistant at the ETH Zürich, Switzerland, and Marie-Curie-Fellow at the Technical University of Tampere, Finland. From 2003 to 2007 he was first PostDoc and then group leader at the Max-Planck-Institute of Stuttgart, Germany, and, till 2012 at the Leibniz Institute of Dresden, Germany. In 2019 he was elected corresponding member of the Austrian Academy of Sciences. Throughout his career, he has been developing new methods to obtain, study, and control epitaxial quantum dots. The main current focus is on the optimization of quantum dots as quantum light sources and their post-growth tuning via microstructured piezoelectric actuators. He is coauthor of more than 230 peer-reviewed papers with more than 7000 citations and has given 100 invited talks on his research activities.

Chris Ford – University of Cambridge

Chris Ford is Professor of Quantum Electronics at the Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge. After studying at Cambridge, and a postdoc at the IBM TJ Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, he returned to Cambridge as a Research Fellow at Girton College and then university lecturer and later full professor. He pioneered measurements of the Aharonov-Bohm effect in semiconductor rings and antidots, and quenching of the Hall effect in ballistic junctions. He introduced the plunger gate for tuning gate-defined quantum dots, and manipulates single electrons using surface acoustic waves, transferring them back and forth between static quantum dots, recently using them to produce single photons. He also investigates interactions in 1D channels by measuring tunnelling between them and a 2D layer below acting as a spectrometer. His team has observed spin-charge separation and has gone beyond the linear Luttinger-liquid regime, observing ‘replica’ dispersions for the first time, and a momentum-dependent power-law.

Ilaria Zardo

Since 2015 Ilaria Zardo is assistant professor in the Department of Physics at the University of Basel, where she leads the Nanophononics group. She received her PhD in Physics in 2010 from the Technische Universität (TU) München and the Università degli Studi di Roma “Sapienza”.
She was awarded in 2017 with the ERC Starting Grant for the project “PHONUIT”. In 2015 she received the Hertha-Sponer Prize, awarded to a female scientist for outstanding scientific work in the field of physics.
Her expertise is spectroscopy on single nanostructures, with focus on inelastic light scattering experiments, and investigation of thermal transport in low dimensional systems.

H. Material growth, structural properties and characterization, phonons

Prof. Susanne Stemmer – University of California, Santa Barbar

Susanne Stemmer is Professor of Materials at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She did her doctoral work at the Max-Planck Institute for Metals Research in Stuttgart (Germany) and received her degree from the University of Stuttgart in 1995.  Her research interests are in the development of scanning transmission electron microscopy techniques, molecular beam epitaxy, functional and strongly correlated oxide heterostructures, and topological materials.  She has authored or co-authored more than 250 publications.  Honors include election to Fellow of the American Ceramic Society, Fellow of the American Physical Society, Fellow of the Materials Research Society, Fellow of the Microscopy Society of America, and a Vannevar Bush Faculty Fellowship of the Department of Defense.

Peter Krogstrup

With a background as a professional musician, the path for Peter Krogstrup to Scientific Director of Microsoft Quantum Materials Lab Copenhagen was unconventional. Peter began his study in Physics in 2004, in a relatively late age. In 2009, he achieved his master’s degree with a specialization in Materials Physics from the University of Copenhagen. In 2013, he defended his PhD thesis in ‘Dynamical Theory and Experiments on GaAs Nanowire Growth for Photovoltaic Applications’ at the University’s Niels Bohr Institute Denmark.Following, he stepped into the role of Assistant Professor at Niels Bohr Institute’s Center for Quantum Devices (QDev), deepening his engagement in the world of Materials science. His passion in crystalline materials as relates to quantum physics was a steppingstone to his collaboration with Microsoft starting in 2015. Today, Peter is leading the Microsoft Quantum Materials Lab Copenhagen.

Prof. Chris Palmstrom

Chris Palmstrøm is a Professor in Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Materials Departments at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His research involves atomic level control and interface formation during molecular beam and chemical beam epitaxial growth of metallic compounds, metal oxides and compound semiconductors. He received his B.Sc. in physics and electronic engineering and Ph.D. in electrical and electronic engineering from the University of Leeds. After being a Lecturer in Norway and a Research Associate at Cornell, he joined Bellcore as a Member of Technical Staff in 1985. From 1994-2007 he was a Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science at the University of Minnesota. In 2007 he joined the faculty at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He has pioneered dissimilar materials epitaxial growth studies using a combination of molecular beam epitaxial growth with in-situ surface science probes, and ex-situ structural and electronic characterization.

Prof. Catherine Stampfl 

Information available soon 

I. Optical properties, optoelectronics, solar cells

Chennupati Jagadish – Research School of Physics at the ANU

Professor Jagadish is a Distinguished Professor and Head of Semiconductor Optoelectronics and Nanotechnology Group in the Research School of Physics at the ANU.  Jagadish is the Editor-in-Chief of Applied Physics Reviews (IF:12.75), Editor of 3 book series and serves on editorial boards of 19 other journals.  He has published more than 930 research papers (650 journal papers), holds 5 US patents, co-authored a book, co-edited 13 books and edited 12 conference proceedings and 17 special issues of Journals. He is a Fellow of 9 science and engineering Academies and 14 professional societies. He has received many awards including IEEE Pioneer Award in Nanotechnology, IEEE Photonics Society Engineering Achievement Award, OSA Nick Holonyak Jr Award, Welker Award, IUMRS Somiya Award, UNESCO medal for his contributions to the development of nanoscience and nanotechnologies and Lyle medal from Australian Academy of Science for his contributions to Physics, AOS Beattie Steel Medal and IEEE Education Award from EDS.  He has received Australia’s highest civilian honor, AC, Companion of the Order of Australia in 2016.

Anita Ho-Baillie – University of Sydney 

Professor Anita Ho-Baillie is the John Hooke Chair of Nanoscience at the University of Sydney. She completed her Bachelor of Engineering on Co-op scholarship and PhD (2005) at University of New South Wales. She has worked in British Aerospace, Alcatel Australia, Pacific Solar and Solar Sailor. Her research interests include the study of photovoltaic materials and devices at nanoscale and engineering them for the purpose of integrating solar cells onto all kinds of surfaces generating clean energy. A highly cited researcher, she has been identified as one of the leaders in advancing perovskite solar cells. She is well known in the media for her building integrated photovoltaics research and setting solar cell energy efficiency records in various categories such as silicon (Si) solar cells, large area single junction perovskite solar cells, perovskite/Si tandem solar cells and III-V/Si tandem solar cells.

Trong Toan Tran – University of Technology, Sydney

Dr. Trong Toan Tran is a Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the School of Mathematical and Physical Science, Faculty of Science, UTS. He is a physicist with some background in Material Science and Chemical Engineering. His research interest includes quantum optics, nanophotonics, solid-state physics, and nanofabrication.  Dr. Tran completed his doctoral thesis entitled “Quantum Emission from Hexagonal Boron Nitride” with Prof. Igor Aharonovich and Prof. Milos Toth. During his Ph.D. candidature, he has made a breakthrough in the field of quantum optics and materials science with his discovery of a class of room-temperature ultra-bright quantum light sources embedded in sheets of atomically thin crystals, known as “white-graphene” or hexagonal boron nitride. Currently, Dr. Tran’s actively researches novel quantum light sources and their integration into optical architectures to form high-performance and robust on-chip platforms, as well as their applications in secured communications, nanoscale sensing, and advanced photonic technologies.

J. Organic semiconductors

Thuc-Quyen Nguyen – Center for Polymers and Organic Solids at the University of California, Santa Barbara

Thuc-Quyen Nguyen is the Director of the Center for Polymers and Organic Solids at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Her current research interests are doping and charge transport in organic semiconductors, bioelectronics, and device physics of organic solar cells, ratchets, electrochemical transistors, and photodetectors.

Recognition for her research includes the 2005 Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award, the 2006 National Science Foundation CAREER Award, the 2007 Harold Plous Award, the 2008 Camille Dreyfus Teacher Scholar Award, the 2009 Alfred Sloan Research Fellows, the 2010 National Science Foundation American Competitiveness and Innovation Fellows, the 2015 Alexander von Humboldt Senior Research Award, the 2016 Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry, the 2019 Hall of Fame – Advanced Materials, the 2019 Beaufort Visiting Scholar, St John’s College, Cambridge University, and the 2015-2018 the World Top 1% Highly Cited Researchers in Materials Science by Thomson Reuters and Clarivate Analytics.

Oana Jurchescu

Prof. Oana Jurchescu joined the Physics department at Wake Forest University (WFU) in 2009, where she is an Associate Professor and the Associate Chair. She received her PhD in 2006 from University of Groningen, the Netherlands, and was a postdoctoral researcher at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, MD, USA (2007 – 2009). Her expertise is in charge transport in organic semiconductors, device physics, and structure-property relationships in organic and hybrid functional materials. She won the National Science Foundation CAREER award, several university-wide teaching and mentoring awards, the WFU Award for Excellence in Research and the Wake Forest Innovation award. She co-authored over 80 publications, 4 book chapters, holds 3 patents, and gave over 70 invited or plenary talks at conferences. She is a member of the executive committee of the Division of Materials Research within American Physical Society.

Prof Paul Burn – (University of Queensland)

After completing my PhD, I carried out post-doctoral research at Cambridge University for four years, being the Dow Research Fellow at Christ’s College for three years. In 1992 I took up a Lectureship in Organic Chemistry at Oxford University and a Tutorial Fellowship at University College, Oxford. In March 2007 I joined The University of Queensland as an ARC Federation Fellow.

K. Perovskites

Paulina Plochocka – LNCMI, Toulouse

Plochocka obtained her PhD cum-laude in 2004 at the University of Warsaw working on the dynamics of many-body interactions between carriers in doped semi-magnetic quantum wells (QW). During her first post doc at Weizmann Institute of science, she started working on the electronic properties of a high mobility 2D electron gas in the fractional and integer quantum Hall Effect regime. She continued this topic during second post doc in LNCMI Grenoble, where she was holding individual Marie Curie scholarship. At the same time, she enlarged her interest of 2D materials towards graphene and other layered materials as TMDCs or black phosphorus. In 2012 she obtained permanent position in LNCMI Toulouse, where she created the Quantum Electronics group, which investigates the electronic and optical properties of emerging materials under extreme conditions of high magnetic field and low temperatures. Examples include semiconducting layer materials such as transition metal dichalcogenides, GaAs/AlAs core shell nanowires and organic inorganic hybrid perovskites.

Joseph J. Berry – Senior Scientist, National Renewable Energy Laboratory 

Joseph Berry (@joe_jberry) is a senior scientist at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory working on halide perovskite solar cells. His PhD for work was on spin transport and physics in semiconductor heterostructures from Penn State University.  His efforts at NREL emphasize relating basic interfacial properties to technologically relevant device level behaviors in traditional and novel semiconductor heterostructures including oxides, organics and most recently hybrid semiconducting materials. He leads the US Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy Technology Office’s SETO core technology program, “De-risking Halide Perovskite Solar Cells” at NREL. He is also a principle investigator on the NREL lead Department of Energy, Center for Hybrid Organic Inorganic Semiconductors for Energy (CHOISE) Energy Frontier Research Center, exploring basic aspect of hybrid materials (www.choise-efrc.org).

Jinsong Huang

Jinsong Huang is a Louis D. Robin, Jr. Distinguished Professor in the Department of Applied Physical Science at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is the associate director of Center for Hybrid Organic Inorganic Semiconductors for Energy (CHOISE)- An EFRC center, director of Center of Hybrid Materials Enabled Electronic Technology (CH-MEET), a University of North Carolina’s Research Opportunities Initiative center. His current research focuses on high performance, low cost electronic materials and devices including perovskite solar cells, photodetectors, radiation detectors, and X-ray imagers. He has been the list of world top 1% highly cited researchers in materials science by Thomson Reuters, Clarivate Analytics, and Web of Science in the last five years.

 

L. Quantum optics, nanophotonics

Mutsuko Hatano – Vice President of the Japan Society of Applied Physic 

Mutsuko Hatano received the Ph.D. degree from Keio University. She joined Central Research Laboratory, Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo, Japan, and was engaged in research and development on the superconducting devices, mobile displays, and power electronics. She was a chief researcher at the CRL and the project manager of the environment electronics. She was a visiting researcher at the University of California, Berkeley from 1998 to 2000. In 2010, she joined Tokyo Institute of Technology as a professor of Electrical and Electronic Engineering.  Her main research field is wide-gap semiconductor devices for power electronics and for quantum sensing. She is a member of the Science Council of Japan, a fellow and a vice president of the Japan Society of Applied Physics, and a council of Tokyo Institute of Technology.

Christoph Becher – Saarland University

Christoph Becher is a full professor of physics at Saarland University, Saarbruecken, Germany, leading the quantum optics research group. He received his PhD in physics from University of Kaiserslautern, Germany, in 1998 working on generation of non-classical light from semiconductor lasers. Christoph Becher held two postdoctoral positions: at University of California, Santa Barbara (1999-2000) with the first demonstration of single photon emission from self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots and cavity-QED experiments; at University of Innsbruck, Austria (2001-2005), he was part of the team demonstrating the first quantum gate with trapped ions, generation of multi-ion entangled states, implementation of simple quantum algorithms and cavity QED with trapped ions. His research interests are in the field of quantum technologies for quantum communication & sensing, in particular exploration of color centers in diamond as quantum bits, single photon sources and for magnetometry applications; diamond-based micro-resonators and single photon nonlinear optics, e.g. quantum frequency conversion.

Lan Fu – Department of Electronic Materials Engineering

Lan Fu received her PhD degree from the Australia National University (ANU) in 2001 and she is currently a Professor at the Research School of Physics, ANU. Prof. Fu was the recipient of the IEEE Photonic Society Graduate Student Fellowship (2000), Australian Research Council (ARC) Postdoctoral Fellowship (2002), ARF/QEII Fellowship (2005) and Future Fellowship (2012). She is a senior member of IEEE, IEEE/Photonics and EDS societies. She is also the current member of the Australian Academy of Science National Committee on Materials Science and Engineering, and Secretary of the Executive Committee of Australian Materials Research Society. Lan Fu’s main research interests include design, fabrication and integration of optoelectronic devices (lasers/LEDs and photodetectors) and high efficiency solar cells based on low-dimensional III-V compound semiconductor structures including quantum wells, self-assembled quantum dots and nanowires grown by metal-organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD).

Rose Ahlefeldt

Rose is a Research Fellow in the Research School of Physics at the Australian National University (ANU). She completed her PhD at ANU in 2013, and then worked at Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, France as well as at Montana State University, USA on a Fulbright Scholarship, before returning to Australia in 2016 as an Australian Research Council DECRA fellow. In 2018 she was named Australian Capital Territory Scientist of the Year for her research. Her research focuses on characterising and optimising rare earth crystals for use in quantum information, including as quantum memories, quantum processors and optical quantum interconnects.

M. Semiconductors for MIR and THz

Benedikt Schwarz

Benedikt Schwarz received his MSc in Microelectronics from TU Wien in 2011, investigating quantum effects, discrete dopants and oxide traps in nano-scaled MOS transistors. He received his PhD in 2015, developing a monolithically integrated lab-on-a-chip using quantum cascade technology in the group of Prof. Gottfried Strasser. He then joint the group of F. Capasso at Harvard University and since then is active at both Universities. His research was acknowledged by several awards, including the honorary prize of the Austrian Federal Ministry of Science and Research and innovation awards from the European technology platform Photonics21 and the Federation of Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy Societies. In 2019, he received the renowned ERC Starting Grant and currently he is on a tenure-track position at TU Wien. His group is working on future integrated mid-infrared sensing technologies and covers theory and experiments in the fields of laser dynamics, frequency combs and photonic integration technologies.

Edmund Linfield

Professor Edmund Linfield received his PhD from the Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge in 1991, and took up the Chair of Terahertz Electronics in the School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering at the University of Leeds in 2014. He is Director of the University’s Bragg Centre for Materials Research, and co-leads the ‘Atoms to Devices’ theme of the UK’s Henry Royce Institute for Advanced Materials Research and Innovation. Professor Linfield’s research explores the science and technology of the terahertz frequency region of the electromagnetic spectrum. He jointly led the European Community’s programme that demonstrated the first terahertz frequency quantum cascade laser in 2002, and his current research explores the growth, fabrication, physics and applications of these devices, as well the development of terahertz frequency imaging and spectroscopy systems. He jointly won the UK’s Institute of Physics Faraday Medal in 2014, and is a recipient of a Royal Society Wolfson Merit Award.

Hannah Joyce

Dr Hannah Joyce is a Reader in low-dimensional electronics at the University of Cambridge. She received her PhD in 2010 from the Australian National University and then joined the Department of Physics at the University of Oxford as a postdoctoral researcher. In 2013, Hannah joined the Department of Engineering at the University of Cambridge, where she leads a research group focussing on the development of novel nanomaterials for applications in photonics and electronics. Hannah’s research interests include the growth of novel low-dimensional semiconductor materials via metalorganic chemical vapour deposition, the development of terahertz spectroscopy for contact-free characterisation of nanomaterials, and the development of new nanomaterial-based devices such as photovoltaics, photodetectors and terahertz photonic modulators.

Roger Lewis

Information available soon 

N. Spintronics and spin phenomena

Prof. Ezekiel Johnston-Halperin – Ohio State University

Prof. Johnston-Halperin received his PhD in Physics in 2003 from UC Santa Barbara in the group of David Awschalom followed by a postdoc in the Division of Chemistry at CalTech from 2003-2006 in the group of James Heath. Since 2006 he has served as a tenure track faculty member at The Ohio State University where he currently serves as a Professor of Physics and as a Fellow of the American Physical Society. His research interests span spin and magnetization dynamics across atomic, mesoscopic, and bulk length scales including materials ranging from atoms and molecules to semiconductors, metals, and 2D materials. Recently, his group has demonstrated extremely low loss magnon excitations in molecule-based solids. These room temperature ferrimagnetic films are easily patterned down to micron lengthscales and provide unique opportunities for engineering and exploiting highly coherent magnon modes for use in microwave electronics and quantum information science and technology.

Prof. Christian Degen – ETH Zurich

Prof. Christian Degen received a diploma in physics in 2001 and a Ph.D in nuclear magnetic resonance in 2005 from ETH Zurich. From 2006-2008, he worked under the guidance of Dr. Dan Rugar in the Nanoscale Studies division of the IBM Almaden Research Center in San Jose CA. In September of 2009, he was appointed tenure track assistant professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He moved to ETH Zurich in 2011. Prof. Degen received an ERC Starting Grant in 2012 and an ERC Consolidator Grant in 2018. His laboratory focuses on the development of new magnetic nanoprobes, especially diamond-based quantum sensors and nanomechanical transducers. Prof. Degen is a co-founder of the quantum technology spin-off company QZabre (www.qzabre.com)

Marcos Guimarães – University of Groningen

Marcos H. D. Guimarães studied Physics at the Federal University of Minas Gerais in Brazil, where he obtained a Bachelor and Master degrees in Physics. He received his PhD degree in 2015 from the University of Groningen, The Netherlands, working on “Spin and Charge Transport in Graphene Devices”. After his PhD he was a postdoctoral fellow at Cornell University, USA (2014-2017), supported by two personal fellowships (KIC Fellow, and NWO Rubicon), and Eindhoven University of Technology, the Netherlands (2017-2019), supported by a NWO VENI personal grant. Since 2019 Marcos Guimarães is an Assistant Professor at the University of Groningen, the Netherlands. His research is focused on the use of optical and electrical measurement techniques to study and control the spintronic properties of 2D van der Waals materials and their heterostructures.

Prof. Brian Zhou – Boston College

Brian Zhou is an Assistant Professor of Physics at Boston College, where he leads the Quantum Spintronics Lab. He received his PhD from Princeton University in 2014 and completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Chicago in 2018. Prof. Zhou’s research group focuses on utilizing atomic-scale defect centers in diamond for applications in quantum information and sensing. He has made contributions to the field of quantum control, with experimental demonstrations of Berry phase, holonomic quantum gates, and shortcuts-to-adiabaticity for single spins. Recently, he developed a technique to utilize nitrogen-vacancy centers as sensors for the local optoelectronic properties of two-dimensional materials.

O. Topological states of matter, topological Insulators and Weyl semimetals, Majorana fermions in solid state

Prof. Laurens Molenkamp – University of Würzburg

Laurens W. Molenkamp is an experimental condensed matter physicist. He received his Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of Groningen, and spent several years first with Philips Research Laboratories in Eindhoven and then as Associate Professor at the RWTH in Aachen. He came to the University of Würzburg in 1999 and is now the Chair of Experimental Physics III and leads the II-VI MBE (molecular beam epitaxy) unit. His research interests include quantum transport in nanostructures, semiconductor spintronics, and optical spectroscopy of semiconductors. He was a co-recipient of the American Physical Society 2012 Oliver E. Buckley Condensed Matter Prize[3] for his experimental observation of the quantum spin Hall effect, opening up the field of topological insulators. Since 2012, he has been the Editor[4][5] of the physics journal Physical Review B.[6] He was a 2013 Physics Frontiers Prize laureate (shortlisted for the Fundamental Physics Prize). Thomson Reuters included him on their annual prediction shortlist [7] for the 2014 Nobel Prize for Physics for his experimental research, with Charles L. Kane and Shoucheng Zhang, on the quantum spin Hall effect and topological insulators.

Jelena Klinovaja

Jelena Klinovaja received her Bachelor and Master degree in Applied Mathematics and Physics from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Department of General and Applied Physics, in 2007 and 2009, resp. Subsequently, she joined the group of Prof. Daniel Loss at the University of Basel, where she received her PhD in Theoretical Physics in 2012 with summa cum laude. In 2013, she was awarded a three-year Harvard Fellowship to perform independent research in the area of the theoretical quantum condensed matter physics. Klinovaja was appointed as a tenure track assistant professor at the Department of Physics at the University of Basel in 2014. In February 2019 she was tenured and promoted to associate professor. In her career, she was offered several prestigious fellowships and received research prizes such as the Swiss Physical Society Prize 2013 in Condensed Matter Physics, sponsored by IBM. In 2017, she has received the prestigious Starting Grant of the European Research Council (ERC).

Shengyuan Yang

Shengyuan Yang obtained BSc in Mathematics/Physics from The University of Hong Kong in 2005, and PhD in physics from The University of Texas at Austin in 2011. He worked as an imaging geophysicist in CGG (US) Services at Houston from 2011 to 2013. He joined the Singapore University of Technology and Design as an Assistant Professor in 2013. His research interest includes the physics of topological materials, two-dimensional materials, spintronics and valleytronics, and transport theory.

P. Wide-bandgap semiconductors (GaN, SiC, Ga2O3)

Aurelien David – Google

Aurelien David is an expert in III-Nitride optoelectronics, with 15 years of experience. His research work focuses on III-Nitride physics and optics, LED efficiency and color science. It has led to several demonstrations of record-high performance LED devices. He is currently a researcher at Google. Prior, he was Chief Scientist at Soraa where he led the R&D effort. He is the author of more than 50 journal publications and 60 patents in this field.

 

Chris G. Van de Walle – Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California

Chris Van de Walle is a Distinguished Professor of Materials and the inaugural recipient of the Herbert Kroemer Endowed Chair in Materials Science at the University of California, Santa Barbara.  Prior to joining UCSB in 2004, he was a Principal Scientist at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC).  He received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University in 1986, and was a postdoc at IBM Yorktown Heights (1986-1988) and a Senior Member of Research Staff at Philips Laboratories in Briarcliff Manor (1988-1991). Professor Van de Walle develops and employs first-principles computational techniques to model the structure and behavior of materials. He performs studies of interfaces, surfaces, defects and impurities, and has worked on wide-band-gap semiconductors, nitrides, oxides, hydrogen interactions with materials, and spin centers for quantum information science.  He has published over 400 research papers and holds 24 patents.  Van de Walle is a Member of the U. S. National Academy of Engineering. 

Dr Julita Smalc-Koziorowska – Laboratory of Semiconductor Characterization

Julita Smalc-Koziorowska received her PhD in Material Science in 2013 from Warsaw University of Technology. Since her master thesis she is cooperating with the Institute of High Pressure Physics PAS „Unipress”, where she is employed as an Assistant Professor at the Laboratory of Semiconductor Characterization. Since 2010 she also works as technologist at Top GaN Ltd – a company producing gallium nitride laser diodes. Her research interests span transmission electron microscopy charaterization of semiconductor structures with a special focus on tracking the mechanism of defect introduction in epitaxial nitride layers. Recently, she studied the mechanism of threading dislocation introduction from stacking fault domains in such layers